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"Take care of this sacred medicine
and it will take care of you."

 



Hola passed away on October 22, 1973, followed by his beloved wife, Susie on April 27, 1985. 

 

A SPECIAL TRIBUTE:
The Hola Tso Story

On May 15, 1890, Hola Tso came into this world born into the Kiyaanii and Dibe' lizhinii clans.   It was a time of econonic hardship for the Navajo people as they struggled to re-establish themselves in their native land after having signed the Treaty of 1868 which gave them the right to return to their homeland.

"The Treaty of 1868 did not give the Navajo people the right to vote and to be counted as citizens of the United States.  Oblivious to this fact, the Navajo people endured and survived many hardships brought on by change and spiritual beliefs.  All Navajo's struggled to survive -  they tended to their livestock, farmed their land and became adept as sheepherders, cattlemen, horsemen, silversmiths, and rug weavers.

It was in this environment around Houck and Chambers, Arizona, an area known for its large settlement of cattle ranches, the young Hola Tso grew up being shuffled among relatives as he never knew his parents.  ..... Hola became a rather well-known cowboy and came to be known as Acothle Tso.

The requirement for all Navajo children to become educated was embraced as opportunity by Hola.  He spent several years at the Albuquerque Indian School in Albuquerque, New Mexico where he excelled in sports.  Being a tall, large and hefty person, he was well equipped physically to play football... Hola's favorite sport.

 

 

 

 

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Copyright 1999 NativeLEE.  All Rights Reserved.
Photos and article courtesy of the 1998 32nd NAC Church Convention Magazine.